German submarine U-155 (1941)

U 155 was a German U-boat Type IX C, which was used during the Second World War by the German Navy.

Technology and history

U 155 was a dive boat for ocean use. It was a submarine of the two-shell type and had a displacement of 1120 tons and 1232 tons submerged about. It had a length of 76.76 m, a width of 6.76 m and a draft of 4.70 m. With the two 2200 hp MAN nine-cylinder four-stroke diesel engine s M 9 V 40/46 with a maximum charge of 18.3 knots over water could be achieved. With 10 knots crossing 12,000 nautical mile n could be covered. The two 500 HP SSM double electric machines GU 345/34 had 62 x 62-cell battery type AFA 44 MAL 740 W. It has a top speed of 7.3 knots under water can be achieved. At 4 kn drive a distance of 64 nautical miles could be covered. From 4 bow and 2 stern torpedo tubes 22 torpedoes or up to 44 TMA or 66 TMB mines could be expelled. The depth was 100 – 200 m. Even the Fast time was 35 seconds. It had a 10.5-cm UtoF L / 45 cannon with 180 rounds and 1 x 3.7-cm Fla.-shot weapon with 2625, 1 x 2-cm Fla.-shot weapon with 4250. From 1943/44, was in this type of boat, the expansion of the 10.5 cm gun and installation of 4 x 2-inch twin-bottle shot guns with 8,500. Manning could consist of four officers and 44 s teams. The cost of construction amounted to 6.448 million Reichsmarks.

U 155 was introduced on 1 October 1940 adopted by the AG Weser in Bremen and Kiel on 23 August 1941 passed with Lieutenant Adolf Cornelius Piening as commander in active service. A later captain of the boat, Ensign Louis-Ferdinand of peace Castle, was the youngest at just 20 years of U-boat commander in the entire war.

The boat belonged to its commissioning on 23 August 1941 to 31 January 1942 as a training boat for 4 U-Flotilla at Stettin. After the training was 155 U from 1 February 1942 to 14 August 1944 as a front boat to the 10th U-Flotilla in Lorient before 15 August 1944 to 8 May 1945 to 33 U-Flotilla came to Flensburg.

The boat took ten patrols on which sunk 26 ships with a total tonnage of 140.449 GRT and 6,736 GRT ship could be damaged. On 15 November 1942 U 155 sank the British escort carrier HMS Avenger and the British troopship Ettrick and damaged the U.S. cargo ship ALMAACK. On 4 May 1943 could shoot down a P-51 Mustang of the 126th Squadron RAF the boat.

Use statistics

First patrol

The boat ran on 7 February 1942 at 11.40 clock from Kiel and launched on 8 February 1942 at 15.50 clock in a Heligoland. It ran on 9 February 1942 at 18.45 clock there again, and launched on 27 March 1942 at 10.05 clock in a Lorient. On this lasting 51 days and about 7,740 nm and about 267 nm long under water company in the western Atlantic Ocean to the east coast of the United States off Cape Hatteras three ships were sunk with 17,657 tons.

•22, February 1942: the sinking of the Norwegian motor vessel with Sama 1,799 GRT. The ship was sunk by a torpedo. He had loaded 1,000 ts china clay and was on the way from Cardiff and Belfast to St John’s. The ship belonged to the convoy ONS 67 There were 20 dead and 19 survivors.

•22, February 1942: the sinking of the British motor tanker Adellen with 7,984 GRT. The tanker was sunk by a torpedo. He drove in ballast, and was on his way from Newport (Gwent) to Trinidad. There were 36 dead and 12 survivors. The ship belonged to the convoy ONS 67 with 37 ships.

•7 March 1942: the sinking of the Brazilian steamer Arabutan with 7,874 GRT. The steamer was sunk by a torpedo. He had loaded 9,680 tons of coal and coke and was on his way from New York and Hampton Roads to Trinidad and Rio de Janeiro. There was one dead and 54 survivors.

Second war patrol

The boat ran on 20 April 1942 at 19.30 clock from Lorient and ran on 14 June 1942 at 7.35 clock back on there. On this lasting 54 days and about 9284.5 nm and 335.5 nm under water long company in the West Atlantic, the Caribbean and the Panama Canal were sunk seven ships of 32,329 GRT.

•14th May 1942: the sinking of the Belgian Brabant motor vessel with 2,483 tons. The ship was sunk by a torpedo. It went in ballast and was on his way from Glasgow to Trinidad and Curacao. There were three dead and 30 survivors.

•17th May 1942: sinking of the British tanker San Victorio with 8,136 GRT. The tanker was sunk by three torpedoes (a miss). He had 12,000 tonnes of petrol and paraffin and a passenger on board. The ship was en route from Curacao to Freetown over the UK. There were 52 deaths (including the passenger) and a survivor.

•17th May 1942: the sinking of the U.S. motor vessel Challenger with 7,667 GRT. The ship was sunk by three torpedoes (a miss). He had loaded 8,400 tons general cargo and was on his way from New York to Cape Town. There were eight dead and 63 survivors.

•20th May 1942: the sinking of the tanker panama European Sylvan Arrow with 7,797 GRT. The tanker was sunk by a torpedo. He had loaded 12,500 tons of crude oil and was on his way from Curacao in Table Bay. There was one dead and 43 survivors. The ship belonged to the convoy OT 1

•23, May 1942: the sinking of the Panamanian steamer Watsonville with 2,220 GRT. The steamer was sunk by a torpedo. He had loaded cargo and was on the way from Bermuda to Trinidad and St. Vincent. There were no casualties.

•28th May 1942: the sinking of the Dutch steamer Poseidon 1,928 GRT. The steamer was sunk by four torpedoes (two missed shots). He drove in ballst and was on his way from Demerara on Trinidad to New York. It was a total loss with 32 dead.

•30th May 1942: the sinking of the Norwegian motor vessel Baghdad with 2,161 GRT. The ship was sunk by five torpedoes (two missed shots). He had loaded 2,700 tons general cargo and 316 post bag and was on his way from New York to Pernambuco. There were nine dead and 21 survivors.

Third war patrol

The boat ran on 9 July 1942 at 20.30 clock from Lorient and ran on 15 September 1942 at 9.00 clock back there one. On this lasting 76 days and 11,433 nautical miles and about 310 nm long under water company in the western Atlantic Ocean, south off the coast of Trinidad and Guiana ten ships were sunk with 43,514 tons.

•28th July 1942: the sinking of the Brazilian steamer Barbacena with 4,772 GRT. The steamer was sunk by four torpedoes (two missed shots). He had coffee, castor seeds and beans loaded and was on his way from Santos to Trinidad. There were six dead and 54 survivors.

•28th July 1942: the sinking of the Brazilian steamer Piave 2,347 GRT. The steamer was sunk by a torpedo and artillery. He drove in ballast, and was on his way from Belém on Carapito (Venezuela) to Trinidad.

•29th July 1942: the sinking of the Norwegian steamer bill with 2,445 GRT. The steamer was sunk by a torpedo. He had loaded cargo, cocoa and 500 tonnes manganese ore and was on his way from Bahia to Trinidad. There was one dead and 23 survivors.

•30th July 1942: the sinking of the American liner Cranford with 6,096 GRT. The steamer was sunk by a torpedo. He had loaded 6,600 tons chrome ore and 1,600 tons of cotton and was on the way from Cape Town to Trinidad. There were eleven dead and 36 survivors.

•1 August 1942: the sinking of the Dutch steamer Kentar with 5,878 GRT. The steamer was sunk by three torpedoes (a failure). He had loaded 1,500 tons of manganese ore and was on its way from Bombay via Durban and Trinidad to St.John ‘s There were 17 dead and 66 survivors.

•1 August 1942: sinking of the British steamer Clan Macnaughton with 6,088 GRT. The steamer was sunk by two torpedoes. He had 10,670 bales of cotton loaded and was on his way from Alexandria via Freetown to Trinidad. There were five dead and 81 survivors.

•4 August 1942: sinking of the British steamer Empire Arnold with 7,045 GRT. The steamer was sunk by two torpedoes. He had e aircraft, tanks and trucks s and two passengers on board, was on its way from New York to Trinidad and Cape Town to Alexandria. There were nine dead and 50 survivors. The ship belonged to the convoy E-6 with eleven ships.

•5 August 1942: the sinking of the Dutch motor ship Draco with 389 GRT. The ship was sunk by artillery. He had 514 tons general cargo loaded and was on its way from Rio de Janeiro to Santos about Barbados. There were no losses, 16 survivors.

•9 August 1942: Sam Emiliano sinking of the tanker with 8,071 GRT. The tanker was sunk by two torpedoes (a miss). He had loaded 11,286 tons aviation fuel and was on the way from Trinidad to Curacao and Table Bay and to Suez. There were 40 dead and eight survivors.

•10th August 1942: the sinking of the Dutch motor ship with Strabo 383 GRT. The ship was sunk by artillery. He had loaded 504 tons Brazil nuts and was on his way from Maranham to Barranquilla. There were no losses, 13 survivors.

Fourth war patrol

The boat ran on 7 November 1942 at 16.30 clock from Lorient, and launched on 30 December 1942 at 9.45 clock back on there. On this lasting 53 days and 7767 nautical miles long company in the mid-Atlantic, west of Gibraltar and Morocco, two ships with 19,735 GRT and an aircraft carrier with 13,785 tonnes were sunk and damaged a ship with 6,736 tons.

•15th November 1942: Damage to the U.S. Material handling ALMAACK with 6,736 GRT. The ship was damaged by torpedoes. The ship belonged to the convoy MKF 1Y with eight ships.

•15th November 1942: the sinking of the British troop transport Ettrick with 11,279 GRT. The ship was sunk by torpedoes. It went in ballast and was on his way from Gibraltar to Glasgow. The ship belonged to the convoy MKF 1Y with eight ships. There were 24 dead and 250 survivors.

•15th November 1942: sinking of the British escort aircraft carrier HMS Avenger with 13,785 ts. The aircraft carrier was sunk by torpedoes. He belonged to the convoy MKF 1Y with eight ships. There were 470 dead and 12 survivors.

•6 December 1942: the sinking of the Dutch steamer Serooskerk with 8,456 GRT. The steamer was sunk by four torpedoes (a failure). He had loaded 2,314 tons of military equipment, as well as 4,246 tons general cargo and was on his way from London to Durban and Colombo to Calcutta. The ship belonged to the convoy ON 149 It was a total loss, with 83 dead.

Fifth war patrol

The boat ran on 8 February 1943 at 16.20 clock from Lorient and expired on 30 April 1943 at 14.30 clock back there one. On this lasting 81 days and 11,472 nautical miles long company in the West Atlantic, the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico were sunk two ships of 7,973 GRT.

•2 April 1943: the sinking of the Norwegian steamer Lysefjord 1,091 GRT. The steamer was sunk by two torpedoes (a miss). He had wood, asphalt and s machine loaded and was on his way from Tampa to Puerto Barrios. There were four dead and 18 survivors.

•3 April 1943: the sinking of the U.S. Tanker Gulfstate with 6,882 GRT. The tanker was sunk by two torpedoes. He had 68,417 barrels of diesel oil loaded and was on the way from Corpus Christi to New York to Portland (Maine). There were 36 dead and 38 survivors.

Sixth war patrol

The boat was 10 June 1943 at 14.00 clock from Lorient and ran on 16 June 1943 at 15.40 clock back on there.

U 155 was born on 14 June 1943 from a plane of 307 RAF squadron attacked and slightly damaged and had to abort the mission.

Seventh patrol

The boat ran on 30 June 1943 at 15.00 clock from Lorient and ran on 11 August 1943 at 17.33 clock back there one. On this lasting 42 days and 5,832 nautical miles long company in the Mid-Atlantic no ships were sunk or damaged. Three boats were supplied Monsoon Group (East Asia boats).

Eighth war patrol

The boat ran on 18 September 1943 at 18.30 clock from Lorient and ran on 19 September 1943 at 22.45 clock in a Brest. It ran on 21 September 1943 at 16.10 clock back out there and ran on 1 January 1944 at 9.30 clock in a Lorient. On this lasting 115 days and about 11,700 sm long company in the mid-Atlantic, west of the Azores and off the Brazilian coast a ship with 5,393 GRT sunk. U 155 was on 4/5 October 1943 by U 488 supplied with provisions, and 30 cubic meters of fuel.

•24th October 1943: the sinking of the Norwegian motor vessel Siranger with 5,393 GRT. The ship was sunk by a torpedo TV. It had loaded 7,300 tons cargo and five armored cars, trucks and road construction equipment and was on his way from New York and Trinidad to Takoradi and Duala. There were no casualties.

Ninth war patrol

The boat ran on 5 March 1944 at 19.00 clock and ran out of Lorient on 6 March 1944 at 18.25 clock for damage after an air attack there again one. It ran on 11 March 1944 at 18.45 clock back from Lorient and ran on 23 June 1944 at 6.30 clock back there one. On this lasting 109 days and about About 8.450 nm and 2.348 nm under water long company in the Central and South Atlantic, in Freetown and the Gulf of Guinea no ships were sunk or damaged.

Tenth patrol

The boat ran on 9 September 1944 from Lorient, and launched on 17 October 1944 at 19.50 clock in Kristiansand one. It ran on 18 October 1944 at 18.00 clock from there again and ran on 19 October 1944 in Frederikshavn one. On the same day at 12.30 clock left Frederikshavn U 155 and ran on 21 October 1944 at 19.00 clock in Flensburg. On this 42 days lasting about 895 nm and about 1,568 nm long under water company in the North Atlantic and to transfer the boat to Germany no ships were sunk or damaged.

Whereabouts

After the unconditional surrender of the Wehrmacht on 8 May 1945 the boat was handed over to the Allies on 30 June 1945 brought to Loch Ryan in Scotland. On 21 December 1945 it was part of Operation Deadlight about 100 nautical mile n sunk off the Irish coast.

U 155 lost five crew members during his tenure.

Submarine Class IX

AG Weser

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